Navigation – Plan du site
Sites and their landscapes

Understanding the origin of magnetic znomalies in Monte San Vincenzo (Southern Italy) archaeological Site: susceptibility measurements, PXRD, XRF and optical analysis

M. Ciminale, D. Gallo, M. Pallara et Rocco Laviano
p. 43-45

Texte intégral

1In the 2002 a multidisciplinary research project began studying the ancient landscapes of Tavoliere, an agricultural area located in Southern Italy that, as shown by historical and archaeological documentations, has been intensively populated from the Neolithic until the Middle Ages (e.g. Bradford, 1949; Jones, 1987; Volpe, 2001). Since the number and extent of the sites (villages, villas, farms, necropolis, etc.) render the planning of a systematic programme of excavations very difficult, a non-invasive investigation combining aerial photography and high-resolution magnetic surveys has been carried out in order to locate and identify buried archaeological features over wide areas (Ciminale et al., 2007), obtaining information useful for a synoptic reconstruction of the deep transformations that occurred in this territory (landscape archaeology).

2One of the surveyed sites is a vast Neolithic settlement placed on a hill top (Monte San Vincenzo) along the Celone river valley. Both crop marks and magnetic anomalies (Fig. 1) appeared very intense and were sharply defined allowing a detailed recognition of the buried structures. Subsequent targeted excavations brought to light part of a C-shaped compound (Fig. 2) providing, in addition, the complete information on the geometry and location of the sources of recorded remotely sensed data.

Figure 1: Final result of the integrated survey in Monte San Vincenzo Site: part of the processed magnetogram ([-18, 18] nT black/white).

Figure 1: Final result of the integrated survey in Monte San Vincenzo Site: part of the processed magnetogram ([-18, 18] nT black/white).

Intense magnetic anomalies outline precisely shape and position of the buried structures. Apart from the general plan of the Neolithic village, a pattern of regularly spaced spot features is clearly identifiable. These define the layout of an ancient olive grove whose orientation is in agreement with the roman land subdivision. The white rectangle delimits signals chosen for the targeted excavation.

Figure 2: Photo of the excavated ditches.

Figure 2: Photo of the excavated ditches.

3In order to understand the origin of the relevant magnetic anomalies, susceptibility measurements were also performed; the detected contrast between the filling material and the calcareous bedrock was used to create synthetic models of the archaeological sources. Theoretical and experimental data were subsequently compared.

4Following this the material filling the ditches was sampled for Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and optical analysis. PXRD quantitative analyses showed a variable presence of clay minerals, quartz, feldspars and calcite. Among the clay minerals, illite plus muscovite are more abundant than smectite. XRF analysis data displayed SiO2, CaO, Al2O3, Fe2O3 and K2O as main oxides as in the “tout venant” samples as in the clay fraction (ф<2µm) (tab. 1). Optical microscope observations showed many crystals of pyroxenes, amphiboles, melanite garnets, magnetite, hematite and amorphous Fe-oxide-hydroxides (Fig. 3). Furthermore microscope optical analyses indicated the presence of volcanic rock pumices and lava fragments.

Table 1: Average chemical composition of (1) “tout venant” samples and (2) clay fraction samples.

Table 1: Average chemical composition of (1) “tout venant” samples and (2) clay fraction samples.

Figure 3: Microphotograph showing magnetic fraction of the filling material. Fragments of magnetite (Mag) and some pyroxenes (Px) can be clearly identified.

Figure 3: Microphotograph showing magnetic fraction of the filling material. Fragments of magnetite (Mag) and some pyroxenes (Px) can be clearly identified.

5All these interesting results, let us hypothesize that the provenance of the material filling the ditches, and thus its magnetic properties, can be ascribed to the nearby (55 km) Vulture volcano complex.

6Eventually, since the presence of magnetic minerals in clayey materials indicates the occurrence of alluvial and colluvial process, a spatial distribution of the igneous products could be inferred from geomorphological studies (Eramo et al., 2004; Laviano & Muntoni 2006) and therefore it could be used to analyze magnetic data recorded in other sites surveyed in the same territory.

Ministry of University and Research (PRIN04/08) and University of Bari (EF06-07-08) supported this research financially.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Ciminale, M., Becker, H. and Gallo, D., 2007. Integrated Technologies for Archaeological Investigation; the Celone Valley Project.Archaeological Prospection, 14: 167-181.

Bradford, J. S. P., 1949. Buried landscapes in Southern Italy. Antiquity, 23: 58-72.

Jones, G. D. B., 1987.Apulia – Vol. I: Neolithic Settlements in the Tavoliere. Thames and Hudson Ltd, London.

Volpe, G., 2001. Linee di storia del paesaggio dell’Apulia romana: San Giusto e la valle del Celone. Pragmateiai, Edipuglia ed., 7, Bari: 315-361.

Eramo, G., Laviano, R., Muntoni, I. M. and Volpe, G., 2004.Late Roman coocking pottery from the Tavoliere area (Southern Italy): raw materials and technological aspects. Journal of Cultural Heritage, 5: 157-165.

Laviano, R. and Muntoni, I. M., 2006.Provenance and technology of Apulian Neolitic pottery. Geomaterials in Cultural Heritage, Geological Society London, 257: 49-62.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Figure 1: Final result of the integrated survey in Monte San Vincenzo Site: part of the processed magnetogram ([-18, 18] nT black/white).
Légende Intense magnetic anomalies outline precisely shape and position of the buried structures. Apart from the general plan of the Neolithic village, a pattern of regularly spaced spot features is clearly identifiable. These define the layout of an ancient olive grove whose orientation is in agreement with the roman land subdivision. The white rectangle delimits signals chosen for the targeted excavation.
URL http://archeosciences.revues.org/docannexe/image/1253/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 324k
Titre Figure 2: Photo of the excavated ditches.
URL http://archeosciences.revues.org/docannexe/image/1253/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 296k
Titre Table 1: Average chemical composition of (1) “tout venant” samples and (2) clay fraction samples.
URL http://archeosciences.revues.org/docannexe/image/1253/img-3.png
Fichier image/png, 12k
Titre Figure 3: Microphotograph showing magnetic fraction of the filling material. Fragments of magnetite (Mag) and some pyroxenes (Px) can be clearly identified.
URL http://archeosciences.revues.org/docannexe/image/1253/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 306k
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

M. Ciminale, D. Gallo, M. Pallara et Rocco Laviano, « Understanding the origin of magnetic znomalies in Monte San Vincenzo (Southern Italy) archaeological Site: susceptibility measurements, PXRD, XRF and optical analysis », ArcheoSciences, 33 (suppl.) | 2009, 43-45.

Référence électronique

M. Ciminale, D. Gallo, M. Pallara et Rocco Laviano, « Understanding the origin of magnetic znomalies in Monte San Vincenzo (Southern Italy) archaeological Site: susceptibility measurements, PXRD, XRF and optical analysis », ArcheoSciences [En ligne], 33 (suppl.) | 2009, mis en ligne le 30 octobre 2011, consulté le 22 octobre 2017. URL : http://archeosciences.revues.org/1253 ; DOI : 10.4000/archeosciences.1253

Haut de page

Auteurs

M. Ciminale

Department of Geology and Geophysics, Campus Universitario, 70125 Bari (Italy) (marci@geo.uniba.it)

D. Gallo

Department of Geology and Geophysics, Campus Universitario, 70125 Bari (Italy) (d.gallo@geo.uniba.it)

M. Pallara

Department Geomineralogico Campus Universitario, 70125 Bari (Italy) (m.pallara@geomin.uniba.it)

Rocco Laviano

Department Geomineralogico Campus Universitario, 70125 Bari (Italy) (rocco.laviano@geomin.uniba.it)

Articles du même auteur

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

Article L.111-1 du Code de la propriété intellectuelle.

Haut de page